Chesterfield and Derby counsellor

Vision of Wholeness

counsellor for derby or derbyshire

Fairy tales, myths, stories and dreams inform my work with those clients who want to explore their lives deeper beyond short-term work.

My Transpersonal Psychology and Psychosynthesis teachers and mentors were inspired by Carl Gustav Jung and Roberto Assagioli.

A student of Assagioli and psychotherapist, Piero Ferrucci included this following story in his very useful practical book, 'What We May Be…'

After years of searching the Seeker was told to go to the cave in which he would find a well. “Ask the well what is Truth” he was advised, “and the well will reveal it to you”. Having found the well, the Seeker asked that most fundamental question. From the depths came the answer, “Go to the village crossroad; there you shall find what you are seeking.”

Full of hope and anticipation, the seeker ran to the crossroad, to find only three rather uninteresting shops. One shop was selling pieces of metal, another sold wood, and thin wires were for sale in the third. Nothing and no one there seemed to have much to do with the revelation of the truth.

Disappointed, the seeker returned to the well to demand an explanation but he was told only, “You will understand in the future.” When the seeker protested all he got in return were echoes of his own shouts. Indignant for having been made a fool of (or so he thought at the time), the seeker continued his wonderings for Truth.

As years went by the memory of his experience at the well gradually faded until one night while he was walking in the moonlight the sound of sitar music caught his attention. It was wonderful music and it was played with great mastery and inspiration. Profoundly moved the truth seeker felt drawn towards the player. He became aware of the sitar itself and then suddenly he exploded in a cry of joyous recognition. The sitar was made out of wires and pieces of metal and wood just like those he had once seen in the three shops and had thought to be without any particular significance.

At last he understood the message of the well: We have already been given everything we need: our task is to assemble and use it in the appropriate way. Nothing is meaningful as long as we perceive only separate fragments. However, as soon as the fragments come together into synthesis a new entity emerges whose nature we could not have foreseen by considering the fragments alone.

From 'What we may be' by Piero Ferrucci